Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2809–2820, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2809-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2809–2820, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2809-2018

Research article 27 Feb 2018

Research article | 27 Feb 2018

Importance of sulfate radical anion formation and chemistry in heterogeneous OH oxidation of sodium methyl sulfate, the smallest organosulfate

Kai Chung Kwong et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (19 Jan 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (22 Jan 2018) by Alexander Laskin
Download
Short summary
To date, it remains unclear how organosulfates evolve over time in the atmosphere. We demonstrate that heterogeneous OH oxidation of sodium methyl sulfate, the smallest organosulfate found in atmospheric aerosols, is efficient. The oxidation can lead to the formation of sulfate radical anion and produce inorganic sulfate. In addition to OH radicals, sulfate radical anion chemistry can play a role in determining the evolution of sodium methyl sulfate and other organosulfates during oxidation.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint