Articles | Volume 18, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 17325–17354, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-17325-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 17325–17354, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-17325-2018

Research article 06 Dec 2018

Research article | 06 Dec 2018

CALIPSO (IIR–CALIOP) retrievals of cirrus cloud ice-particle concentrations

David L. Mitchell et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by David Mitchell on behalf of the Authors (28 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Oct 2018) by Timothy Garrett
AR by David Mitchell on behalf of the Authors (12 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Nov 2018) by Timothy Garrett
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Short summary
To realistically model a changing climate, global measurements of cirrus cloud ice-particle number concentration (N) and size (De) are needed, through which one may infer the general mechanism of ice formation. A satellite remote sensing method was developed to measure N and De. It was found that N was highest and De lowest at high latitudes. In the Arctic, cirrus clouds occurred much more often during winter, which may have an impact on mid-latitude winter weather.
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