Articles | Volume 18, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15705–15723, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15705-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15705–15723, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15705-2018

Research article 01 Nov 2018

Research article | 01 Nov 2018

Trends in air pollutants and health impacts in three Swedish cities over the past three decades

Henrik Olstrup et al.

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Latest update: 29 Jul 2021
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Short summary
This article analyzes the health effects caused by changes in air pollution concentrations during the period of 1990–2015 in Stockholm, Gothenburg, and Malmö: the three largest cities in Sweden. The air pollutants that have been measured and analyzed are NOx, NO2, O3, and PM10. NOx and NO2 exhibit decreasing trends during this period, with beneficial effects on public health. An overall conclusion is that public health can largely benefit from reduced air pollution levels.
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