Articles | Volume 18, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14949–14964, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14949-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14949–14964, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14949-2018

Research article 18 Oct 2018

Research article | 18 Oct 2018

A satellite-based estimate of combustion aerosol cloud microphysical effects over the Arctic Ocean

Lauren M. Zamora et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,522 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
957 531 34 1,522 113 32 40
  • HTML: 957
  • PDF: 531
  • XML: 34
  • Total: 1,522
  • Supplement: 113
  • BibTeX: 32
  • EndNote: 40
Views and downloads (calculated since 30 May 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 30 May 2018)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,504 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,490 with geography defined and 14 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Latest update: 02 Mar 2021
Download
Short summary
We use satellite data and model output to estimate how airborne particles (aerosols) affect cloud ice particles and droplets over the Arctic Ocean. Aerosols from sources like smoke and pollution can change cloud cover, precipitation frequency, and the portion of liquid- vs. ice-containing clouds, which in turn can impact the surface energy budget. By improving our understanding these aerosol–cloud interactions, this work can help climate predictions for the rapidly changing Arctic.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint