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ACP | Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14695–14714, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14695-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Atmospheric emissions from oil sands development and their...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14695–14714, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14695-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 12 Oct 2018

Research article | 12 Oct 2018

A comparison of plume rise algorithms to stack plume measurements in the Athabasca oil sands

Mark Gordon et al.

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Short summary
This work uses aircraft-based measurements of smokestack plumes carried out in northern Alberta in 2013. These measurements are used to test equations used to predict how high in the air smokestack plumes rise. It is important to predict plume rise height accurately as it tells us how far downwind pollutants are carried and what air quality can be expected at the surface. We found that the equations that are typically used significantly underestimate the plume rise at this location.
This work uses aircraft-based measurements of smokestack plumes carried out in northern Alberta...
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