Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14493–14510, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14493-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14493–14510, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14493-2018

Research article 10 Oct 2018

Research article | 10 Oct 2018

Atmospheric oxidation in the presence of clouds during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) study

William H. Brune et al.

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Latest update: 18 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Thunderstorms pull in polluted air from near the ground, transport it up through clouds containing lightning, and deposit it at altitudes where airplanes fly. The resulting chemical mixture in this air reacts to form ozone and particles, which affect climate. In this study, aircraft observations of the reactive gases responsible for this chemistry generally agree with modeled values, even in ice clouds. Thus, atmospheric oxidation chemistry appears to be mostly understood for this environment.
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