Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14197–14215, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14197-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 14197–14215, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-14197-2018
Research article
08 Oct 2018
Research article | 08 Oct 2018

Aerosol chemistry, transport, and climatic implications during extreme biomass burning emissions over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

Nandita Singh et al.

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Short summary
Airborne particulate emissions from burning of agricultural residue over the Indo-Gangetic Plain have often been associated with formation of haze and adverse health impacts. Short-term variations in aerosol climatology during extreme biomass burning emissions were investigated using both ground and spaceborne sensors. Results highlight three exclusive but interrelated mechanisms, i.e., aerosol chemistry, regional transport, and radiative forcing, which may be useful in regional climate models.
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