Articles | Volume 18, issue 16
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12345-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12345-2018
Research article
 | 
27 Aug 2018
Research article |  | 27 Aug 2018

Historical black carbon deposition in the Canadian High Arctic: a >250-year long ice-core record from Devon Island

Christian M. Zdanowicz, Bernadette C. Proemse, Ross Edwards, Wang Feiteng, Chad M. Hogan, Christophe Kinnard, and David Fisher

Viewed

Total article views: 2,990 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
1,865 1,045 80 2,990 326 67 84
  • HTML: 1,865
  • PDF: 1,045
  • XML: 80
  • Total: 2,990
  • Supplement: 326
  • BibTeX: 67
  • EndNote: 84
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Oct 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Oct 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,990 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 3,005 with geography defined and -15 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 27 May 2024
Download
Short summary
Black carbon (BC) particles emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources (e.g., wildfires, coal burning) can amplify climate warming by increasing sunlight energy absorption on snow-covered surfaces. This paper presents a new ice-core record of historical (1810–1990) BC deposition in the Canadian Arctic. The Devon ice cap record differs from Greenland ice cores, implying large variations in BC deposition across the Arctic that must be accounted for to better quantity their future climate impact.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint