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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 18, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12345–12361, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12345-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12345–12361, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12345-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 Aug 2018

Research article | 27 Aug 2018

Historical black carbon deposition in the Canadian High Arctic: a >250-year long ice-core record from Devon Island

Christian M. Zdanowicz et al.

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Refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations in an ice core from Devon ice cap, Devon Island, Nunavut Christian M. Zdanowicz, Bernadette C. Proemse, Ross Edwards, Wang Feiteng, Chad M. Hogan, Christophe Kinnard, and David Fisher https://doi.org/10.21963/12952

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Black carbon (BC) particles emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources (e.g., wildfires, coal burning) can amplify climate warming by increasing sunlight energy absorption on snow-covered surfaces. This paper presents a new ice-core record of historical (1810–1990) BC deposition in the Canadian Arctic. The Devon ice cap record differs from Greenland ice cores, implying large variations in BC deposition across the Arctic that must be accounted for to better quantity their future climate impact.
Black carbon (BC) particles emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources (e.g., wildfires, coal...
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