Articles | Volume 18, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12315–12327, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12315-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12315–12327, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12315-2018

Research article 24 Aug 2018

Research article | 24 Aug 2018

Tropospheric sources and sinks of gas-phase acids in the Colorado Front Range

James M. Mattila et al.

Data sets

Data Browser for BAO Tower Data D. Welsh, B. Bartram, S. Pezoa, D. Hooper, B. D. Luisi, C. Smith, A. Keane, and D. Wolfe https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/technology/bao/browser/

QC-TILDAS NH3 FRAPPÉ data A. Tevlin and J. Murphy https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/discover-aq.html

O3 and NOx FRAPPÉ data E. McDuffie and S. Brown https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/discover-aq.html

NO2 photolysis rate FRAPPÉ data K. Ullmann and S. Hall https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/discover-aq.html

Acetate CIMS FRAPPÉ data J. Mattila, P. Brophy, J. Kirkland, and D. K. Farmer https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/discover-aq.html

Picarro 6401 cavity ringdown spectrometer FRAPPÉ data E. V. Fischer https://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/missions/discover-aq/discover-aq.html

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Short summary
Molecular acids in the atmosphere have implications for human health and air quality. Measurements of various acidic molecules were performed in the Colorado Front Range. Atmospheric concentrations of many acids increased during the day, indicative of sunlight-related production sources. A surface-level source of many acids persisting throughout day and night was observed. Traffic and agricultural activity were important anthropogenic sources of several acids near the measurement site.
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