Articles | Volume 17, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9917–9930, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9917-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9917–9930, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9917-2017

Research article 23 Aug 2017

Research article | 23 Aug 2017

Modeling the inorganic bromine partitioning in the tropical tropopause layer over the eastern and western Pacific Ocean

Maria A. Navarro et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Maria A. Navarro (deceased) on behalf of the Authors (16 Mar 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Apr 2017) by Martyn Chipperfield
RR by Klaus Pfeilsticker (21 Apr 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (24 Apr 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (09 May 2017) by Martyn Chipperfield
AR by Maria A. Navarro (deceased) on behalf of the Authors (20 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Jul 2017) by Martyn Chipperfield
AR by Maria A. Navarro (deceased) on behalf of the Authors (18 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Inorganic bromine (Bry) plays an important role in ozone layer depletion. Based on aircraft observations of organic bromine species and chemistry simulations, we model the Bry abundances over the Pacific tropical tropopause. Our results show BrO and Br as the dominant species during daytime hours, and BrCl and BrONO2 as the nighttime dominant species over the western and eastern Pacific, respectively. The difference in the partitioning is due to changes in the abundance of O3, NO2, and Cly.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint