Articles | Volume 17, issue 15
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9417–9433, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9417-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 9417–9433, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-9417-2017

Research article 07 Aug 2017

Research article | 07 Aug 2017

Sea ice as a source of sea salt aerosol to Greenland ice cores: a model-based study

Rachael H. Rhodes et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Rachael Rhodes on behalf of the Authors (21 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Jun 2017) by Jianzhong Ma
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (22 Jun 2017)
ED: Publish as is (04 Jul 2017) by Jianzhong Ma
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Short summary
Sea salt aerosol comes from the open ocean or the sea ice surface. In the polar regions, this opens up the possibility of reconstructing sea ice history using sea salt recorded in ice cores. We use a chemical transport model to demonstrate that the sea ice source of aerosol is important in the Arctic. For the first time, we simulate realistic Greenland ice core sea salt in a process-based model. The importance of the sea ice source increases from south to north across the Greenland ice sheet.
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