Articles | Volume 17, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8739–8755, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8739-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8739–8755, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8739-2017

Research article 18 Jul 2017

Research article | 18 Jul 2017

Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

Jenni Alanen et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jenni Alanen on behalf of the Authors (15 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 May 2017) by Rob MacKenzie
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (06 Jun 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Jun 2017) by Rob MacKenzie
AR by Jenni Alanen on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Secondary organic and inorganic aerosols deteriorate air quality. Their formation from a natural gas engine was studied and compared with the emitted primary particulate emission. The volatility of the formed particles was defined as a function of temperature. Photochemical ages 4–11 days, mimicked by a potential aerosol mass chamber, produced 9–20 mg kg−1 fuel SOA. Aged emission particles were found to be less volatile than the fresh, implicating longer stability in the atmosphere.
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