Articles | Volume 17, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8725–8738, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8725-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8725–8738, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8725-2017

Research article 18 Jul 2017

Research article | 18 Jul 2017

Glyoxal yield from isoprene oxidation and relation to formaldehyde: chemical mechanism, constraints from SENEX aircraft observations, and interpretation of OMI satellite data

Christopher Chan Miller et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (30 Mar 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Apr 2017) by Nga Lee Ng
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (24 Apr 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (01 May 2017) by Nga Lee Ng
AR by C. Chan Miller on behalf of the Authors (10 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (29 May 2017) by Nga Lee Ng
AR by C. Chan Miller on behalf of the Authors (05 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Jun 2017) by Nga Lee Ng
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Short summary
The use of satellite glyoxal observations for estimating isoprene emissions has been limited by knowledge of the glyoxal yield from isoprene. We use SENEX aircraft observations over the southeast US to evaluate glyoxal yields from isoprene in a 3-D atmospheric model. The SENEX observations support a pathway for glyoxal formation in pristine regions that we propose here, which may have implications for improving isoprene emissions estimates from upcoming high-resolution geostationary satellites.
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