Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7311–7332, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7311-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7311–7332, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7311-2017
Research article
20 Jun 2017
Research article | 20 Jun 2017

Aerosol indirect effects on the nighttime Arctic Ocean surface from thin, predominantly liquid clouds

Lauren M. Zamora et al.

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Latest update: 02 Feb 2023
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Short summary
Clouds have a major but uncertain effect on Arctic surface temperatures. Here, we used remote sensing observations to better understand aerosol effects on one type of Arctic cloud. By modifying a variety of cloud properties, aerosols in this type of cloud indirectly reduced the net warming effect of these clouds on the surface by ~ 10 % of the clean-background cloud effect, not including changes in cloud fraction. This work will improve our ability to predict future Arctic surface temperatures.
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