Articles | Volume 17, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7245–7259, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7245-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 7245–7259, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-7245-2017

Research article 16 Jun 2017

Research article | 16 Jun 2017

Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

Ashley E. Van Beusekom et al.

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Latest update: 19 Oct 2021
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Short summary
For three years of data in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico, cloud base was lowest during the mid-summer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The results indicate climate change threats to cloud forests are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale weather patterns that increase frequency of drought periods during the wet seasons (periods of higher cloud base) may also impact ecosystem health.
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