Articles | Volume 17, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6153–6175, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6153-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 6153–6175, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-6153-2017

Research article 19 May 2017

Research article | 19 May 2017

New particle formation in the Svalbard region 2006–2015

Jost Heintzenberg et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (21 Feb 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Feb 2017) by James Allan
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (10 Mar 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 Apr 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (03 Apr 2017) by James Allan
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (10 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (11 Apr 2017) by James Allan
AR by Jost Heintzenberg on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (18 Apr 2017) by James Allan
AR by Jost Heintzenberg on behalf of the Authors (27 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Events of new particle formation (NPF) were analyzed objectively in a 10-year data set of hourly particle size distributions recorded on Mt. Zeppelin, Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Three different types of NPF events were identified that were hypothesized to be different expressions of related source processes. Back trajectories and ancillary atmospheric and marine data strongly point to marine biogenic sources causing new particle formation in the summer Arctic.
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