Articles | Volume 17, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2555–2571, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2555-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2555–2571, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2555-2017

Research article 20 Feb 2017

Research article | 20 Feb 2017

Hygroscopic growth of water soluble organic carbon isolated from atmospheric aerosol collected at US national parks and Storm Peak Laboratory

Nathan F. Taylor et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nathan Taylor on behalf of the Authors (18 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (19 Jan 2017) by Armin Sorooshian
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Short summary
The impacts of aerosols on health, visibility, and climate are very sensitive to their ability to take up water under subsaturated conditions and to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. These hydration properties are tightly linked to aerosol composition. This report finds that water soluble organic compounds contribute significantly to atmospheric aerosol hydration both as an independent fraction of aerosol mass and through complementary interactions with common inorganic aerosol constituents.
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