Articles | Volume 17, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14785–14810, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14785-2017

Special issue: Coupled chemistry–meteorology modelling: status and...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 14785–14810, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-14785-2017

Research article 12 Dec 2017

Research article | 12 Dec 2017

Modeling the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols on carbon fluxes in the Amazon region

Demerval S. Moreira et al.

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Latest update: 07 Mar 2021
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Short summary
Fire in the Amazon forest produces a large amount of smoke that is released into the atmosphere and covers a large portion of South America for about 3 months each year. The smoke affects the energy and CO2 budgets. Using a numerical atmospheric model, we demonstrated that the smoke changes the forest from a source to a sink of CO2 to the atmosphere. The smoke ultimately acts to at least partially compensate for the forest carbon lost due to fire emissions.
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