Articles | Volume 17, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11605–11621, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11605-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11605–11621, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11605-2017
Research article
28 Sep 2017
Research article | 28 Sep 2017

Secondary organic aerosol from atmospheric photooxidation of indole

Julia Montoya-Aguilera et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 3,087 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
1,631 1,367 89 3,087 411 42 96
  • HTML: 1,631
  • PDF: 1,367
  • XML: 89
  • Total: 3,087
  • Supplement: 411
  • BibTeX: 42
  • EndNote: 96
Views and downloads (calculated since 28 Mar 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 28 Mar 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 3,118 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 3,108 with geography defined and 10 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 20 Sep 2022
Download
Short summary
Various plant species emit a chemical compound called indole under stressed conditions or during flowering events. Our experiments show that indole can be oxidized in the atmosphere to produce a brownish haze containing well-known indole-derived dyes, such as indigo dye. An airshed model that includes indole chemistry shows that indole aerosol makes a significant contribution to the total aerosol burden and to visibility.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint