Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10811–10835, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10811-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10811–10835, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10811-2017
Research article
14 Sep 2017
Research article | 14 Sep 2017

Radiation in fog: quantification of the impact on fog liquid water based on ground-based remote sensing

Eivind G. Wærsted et al.

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Latest update: 30 Nov 2022
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Short summary
Heating and cooling of fog layers by solar and terrestrial radiation influence the fog life cycle. We quantify these radiative impacts on fog liquid water using detailed cloud radar observations of seven fog events as well as sensitivity studies. We find that the impact of radiation is affected mainly by fog optical thickness, atmospheric humidity and the presence of clouds above the fog. Observing these quantities in real time can therefore be useful for forecasting fog dissipation.
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