Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10675–10690, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10675-2017

Special issue: Twenty-five years of operations of the Network for the Detection...

Special issue: Quadrennial Ozone Symposium 2016 – Status and trends...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10675–10690, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10675-2017

Research article 11 Sep 2017

Research article | 11 Sep 2017

An update on ozone profile trends for the period 2000 to 2016

Wolfgang Steinbrecht et al.

Data sets

SBUV-NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration https://acd-ext.gsfc.nasa.gov/Data_services/merged/

SBUV-NOAA NOAA Climate Prediction Center ftp://ftp.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/SBUV_CDR/

GOZCARDS Jet Propulsion Laboratory https://gozcards.jpl.nasa.gov/

SWOOSH Earth System Research Laboratory https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd/groups/csd8/swoosh/

SAGE II–OSIRIS (+ OMPS) University of Saskatchewan http://osirus.usask.ca/

SAGE II–Ozone_CCI–OMPS European Space Agency and BIRA-IASB http://www.esa-ozone-cci.org/

SAGE II–MIPAS–OMPS Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research - Atmospheric Trace Gases and Remote Sensing https://www.imk-asf.kit.edu/english/304_2857.php

Lidar, microwave, and FTIR data Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) http://www.ndacc.org

Quasi-Biennial-Oscillation (QBO) Data Serie FU Berlin http://www.geo.fu-berlin.de/en/met/ag/strat/produkte/qbo/index.html

Solar radio flux time series Government of Canada and Natural Resources Canada ftp://ftp.geolab.nrcan.gc.ca/data/solar_flux

Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) Earth System Research Laboratory https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/enso/mei/

Stratospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness National Aeronautics and Space Administration https://data.giss.nasa.gov/modelforce/strataer/

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Short summary
Thanks to the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments, ozone-depleting chlorine (and bromine) in the stratosphere has declined slowly since the late 1990s. Improved and extended long-term ozone profile observations from satellites and ground-based stations confirm that ozone is responding as expected and has increased by about 2 % per decade since 2000 in the upper stratosphere, around 40 km altitude. At lower altitudes, however, ozone has not changed significantly since 2000.
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