Articles | Volume 16, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9349–9359, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9349-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9349–9359, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9349-2016

Research article 28 Jul 2016

Research article | 28 Jul 2016

Speciation of OH reactivity above the canopy of an isoprene-dominated forest

J. Kaiser et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jennifer Kaiser on behalf of the Authors (18 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Apr 2016) by Nga Lee Ng
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (09 May 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 May 2016)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (21 May 2016) by Nga Lee Ng
AR by Jennifer Kaiser on behalf of the Authors (09 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (26 Jun 2016) by Nga Lee Ng
AR by Jennifer Kaiser on behalf of the Authors (12 Jul 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (12 Jul 2016) by Nga Lee Ng
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Short summary
OH reactivity can be used to assess the amount of reactive carbon in an air mass. “Missing” reactivity is commonly found in forested environments and is attributed to either direct emissions of unmeasured volatile organic compounds or to unmeasured/underpredicted oxidation products. Using a box model and measurements from the 2013 SOAS campaign, we find only small discrepancies in measured and calculated reactivity. Our results suggest the discrepancies stem from unmeasured direct emissions.
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