Articles | Volume 16, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 5969–5991, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-5969-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 5969–5991, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-5969-2016

Research article 17 May 2016

Research article | 17 May 2016

Organic nitrate chemistry and its implications for nitrogen budgets in an isoprene- and monoterpene-rich atmosphere: constraints from aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations in the Southeast US

Jenny A. Fisher et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jenny Fisher on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (26 Apr 2016) by Chul Han Song
AR by Jenny Fisher on behalf of the Authors (27 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (29 Apr 2016) by Chul Han Song
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Short summary
We use new airborne and ground-based observations from two summer 2013 campaigns in the southeastern US, interpreted with a chemical transport model, to understand the impact of isoprene and monoterpene chemistry on the atmospheric NOx budget via production of organic nitrates (RONO2). We find that a diversity of species contribute to observed RONO2. Our work implies that the NOx sink to RONO2 production is only sensitive to NOx emissions in regions where they are already low.
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