Articles | Volume 16, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4771–4783, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4771-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4771–4783, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4771-2016

Research article 18 Apr 2016

Research article | 18 Apr 2016

Attribution of atmospheric sulfur dioxide over the English Channel to dimethyl sulfide and changing ship emissions

Mingxi Yang et al.

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Exhausts from ships are an important source of air pollution in coastal regions. We observed a ~ 3 fold reduction in the level of sulfur dioxide (a principle pollutant) from the English Channel from 2014 to 2015 after the new International Maritime Organisation regulation on ship sulfur emission became law. Our estimated ship's fuel sulfur content shows a high degree of compliance. Dimethylsulfide from the marine biota becomes a relatively more important source of sulfur in coastal marine air.
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