Articles | Volume 16, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4771–4783, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4771-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 4771–4783, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-4771-2016

Research article 18 Apr 2016

Research article | 18 Apr 2016

Attribution of atmospheric sulfur dioxide over the English Channel to dimethyl sulfide and changing ship emissions

Mingxi Yang et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Mingxi Yang on behalf of the Authors (24 Mar 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Apr 2016) by Eliza Harris
AR by Mingxi Yang on behalf of the Authors (08 Apr 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Apr 2016) by Eliza Harris
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Short summary
Exhausts from ships are an important source of air pollution in coastal regions. We observed a ~ 3 fold reduction in the level of sulfur dioxide (a principle pollutant) from the English Channel from 2014 to 2015 after the new International Maritime Organisation regulation on ship sulfur emission became law. Our estimated ship's fuel sulfur content shows a high degree of compliance. Dimethylsulfide from the marine biota becomes a relatively more important source of sulfur in coastal marine air.
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