Articles | Volume 16, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 3265–3278, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-3265-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 3265–3278, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-3265-2016

Research article 11 Mar 2016

Research article | 11 Mar 2016

Upper tropospheric water vapour variability at high latitudes – Part 1: Influence of the annular modes

Christopher E. Sioris et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Chris Sioris on behalf of the Authors (01 Nov 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Nov 2015) by Thomas von Clarmann
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (25 Nov 2015)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (09 Dec 2015)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (11 Dec 2015) by Thomas von Clarmann
AR by Chris Sioris on behalf of the Authors (05 Feb 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Feb 2016) by Thomas von Clarmann
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (29 Feb 2016)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Mar 2016) by Thomas von Clarmann
Short summary
The AM (annular mode) is the most important internal mode of climatic variability at high latitudes. Upper tropospheric water vapour (UTWV) at high latitudes increases by up to ~ 50 % during the negative phase of the AMs. The response of water vapour to the AMs vanishes above the tropopause. The ultimate goal of the study was to improve UTWV trend uncertainties by explaining shorter-term variability, and this was achieved by accounting for the AM-related response in a multiple linear regression.
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