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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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The amplified Arctic warming has seen a rapid decline in sea ice with serious implications for global climate. The loss of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere is considered important for the recovery of the diminishing sea ice. Yet there is little observational evidence regarding the efficiency of this process. In our study, we explore and quantify the ability of the open ocean to lose heat through sensible heat fluxes. It is found to depend on the prevailing cloud and wind regime.
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Articles | Volume 16, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13173–13184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13173-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 13173–13184, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-13173-2016

Research article 27 Oct 2016

Research article | 27 Oct 2016

The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

Manisha Ganeshan and Dong L. Wu

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Short summary
The amplified Arctic warming has seen a rapid decline in sea ice with serious implications for global climate. The loss of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere is considered important for the recovery of the diminishing sea ice. Yet there is little observational evidence regarding the efficiency of this process. In our study, we explore and quantify the ability of the open ocean to lose heat through sensible heat fluxes. It is found to depend on the prevailing cloud and wind regime.
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