Articles | Volume 16, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 10521–10541, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-10521-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 10521–10541, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-10521-2016

Research article 24 Aug 2016

Research article | 24 Aug 2016

Impacts of aviation fuel sulfur content on climate and human health

Zarashpe Z. Kapadia et al.

Data sets

Technical Note: Ozonesonde climatology between 1995 and 2011: description, evaluation and applications S. Tilmes, J.-F. Lamarque, L. K. Emmons, A. Conley, M. G. Schultz, M. Saunois, V. Thouret, A. M. Thompson, S. J. Oltmans, B. Johnson, and D. Tarasick https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-12-7475-2012

Exploring the vertical profile of atmospheric organic aerosol: comparing 17 aircraft field campaigns with a global model C. L. Heald, H. Coe, J. L. Jimenez, R. J. Weber, R. Bahreini, A. M. Middlebrook, L. M. Russell, M. Jolleys, T.-M. Fu, J. D. Allan, K. N. Bower, G. Capes, J. Crosier, W. T. Morgan, N. H. Robinson, P. I. Williams, M. J. Cubison, P. F. DeCarlo, and E. J. Dunlea https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-12673-2011

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Short summary
Using a coupled tropospheric chemistry-aerosol microphysics model this research paper investigates the effect of variations in aviation fuel sulfur content (FSC) on surface PM2.5 concentrations, increases in aviation-induced premature mortalities, low-level cloud condensation nuclei and radiative effect.

When investigating the climatic impact of variations in FSC the ozone direct radiative effect, aerosol direct radiative effect and aerosol cloud albedo effect are quantified.
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