Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 737–752, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-737-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 737–752, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-737-2015

Research article 20 Jan 2015

Research article | 20 Jan 2015

Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

M. I. Schurman et al.

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Short summary
Atmospheric particles can contribute to environmental degradation. An aerosol mass spectrometer was used with positive matrix factorization to explore submicron particle sources in Rocky Mountain National Park, finding that ammonium (3.9%), nitrate (4.3%), sulfate (16.6%), and two types of oxidized organic aerosol (66.9% total) are transported on upslope winds from the urban Front Range, while local campfires contribute 8.4% of mass.
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