Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 737–752, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-737-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 737–752, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-737-2015

Research article 20 Jan 2015

Research article | 20 Jan 2015

Investigating types and sources of organic aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park using aerosol mass spectrometry

M. I. Schurman et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Misha Schurman on behalf of the Authors (23 Oct 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Nov 2014) by James Allan
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Nov 2014)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (12 Nov 2014)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (12 Nov 2014) by James Allan
AR by Misha Schurman on behalf of the Authors (21 Nov 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Nov 2014) by James Allan
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Short summary
Atmospheric particles can contribute to environmental degradation. An aerosol mass spectrometer was used with positive matrix factorization to explore submicron particle sources in Rocky Mountain National Park, finding that ammonium (3.9%), nitrate (4.3%), sulfate (16.6%), and two types of oxidized organic aerosol (66.9% total) are transported on upslope winds from the urban Front Range, while local campfires contribute 8.4% of mass.
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