Articles | Volume 15, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 6535–6548, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-6535-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 6535–6548, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-6535-2015

Research article 15 Jun 2015

Research article | 15 Jun 2015

Impact of interannual variations in sources of insoluble aerosol species on orographic precipitation over California's central Sierra Nevada

J. M. Creamean et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jessie Creamean on behalf of the Authors (05 May 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (16 May 2015) by Alex Huffman
AR by Jessie Creamean on behalf of the Authors (18 May 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 May 2015) by Alex Huffman
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Short summary
Aerosols impact how clouds and precipitation form. In the California Sierra Nevada, we found that the formation and resulting amount of rain and snow were impacted by mineral dust, bioparticles such as bacteria, and biomass burning and pollution particles during three winter seasons. Dust and bioparticles from distant sources impacted high-altitude clouds by forming ice, leading to more precipitation, whereas local biomass burning and pollution entered the base of clouds, leading to less rain.
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