Articles | Volume 15, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 6271–6281, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-6271-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 6271–6281, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-6271-2015

Research article 09 Jun 2015

Research article | 09 Jun 2015

Meridionally tilted ice cloud structures in the tropical upper troposphere as seen by CloudSat

J. Gong et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jie Gong on behalf of the Authors (21 Mar 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Mar 2015) by Corinna Hoose
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Apr 2015)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Apr 2015)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (15 Apr 2015) by Corinna Hoose
AR by Jie Gong on behalf of the Authors (24 Apr 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (15 May 2015) by Corinna Hoose
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Short summary
Upper-tropospheric ice clouds (anvil and cirrus cloud ouflows extending from deep convection) have small-scale (~1km horizontal) structures that are organized and systematically tilt poleward in the tropics, as revealed by CloudSat ice water path (IWP) and Aura MLS Radiance (TB) measurements. These tilted cloud structures cover regions over hundreds of kilometers, contributing up to 20% of IWP uncertainty if not accounted for in remote sensing from space.
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