Articles | Volume 14, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13361–13376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13361-2014
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13361–13376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13361-2014
Research article
16 Dec 2014
Research article | 16 Dec 2014

On the origin of the occasional spring nitrate peak in Greenland snow

L. Geng et al.

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Short summary
Examinations on snowpit and firn core results from Summit, Greenland suggest that there are two mechanisms leading to the observed double nitrate peaks in some years in the industrial era: 1) long-rang transport of nitrate and 2) enhanced local photochemical production of nitrate. Both of these mechanisms are related to pollution transport, as the additional nitrate from either direct transport or enhanced local photochemistry requires enhanced nitrogen sources from anthropogenic emissions.
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