Articles | Volume 14, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13361–13376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13361-2014
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13361–13376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-13361-2014

Research article 16 Dec 2014

Research article | 16 Dec 2014

On the origin of the occasional spring nitrate peak in Greenland snow

L. Geng et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lei Geng on behalf of the Authors (20 Jun 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Jul 2014) by Jan Kaiser
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (14 Jul 2014)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Jul 2014) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Lei Geng on behalf of the Authors (11 Aug 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Aug 2014) by Jan Kaiser
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (29 Aug 2014)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Sep 2014) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Lei Geng on behalf of the Authors (13 Nov 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (13 Nov 2014) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Lei Geng on behalf of the Authors (13 Nov 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Examinations on snowpit and firn core results from Summit, Greenland suggest that there are two mechanisms leading to the observed double nitrate peaks in some years in the industrial era: 1) long-rang transport of nitrate and 2) enhanced local photochemical production of nitrate. Both of these mechanisms are related to pollution transport, as the additional nitrate from either direct transport or enhanced local photochemistry requires enhanced nitrogen sources from anthropogenic emissions.
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