Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-147
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2021-147

  07 Apr 2021

07 Apr 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal ACP.

Roles of the Inner Eyewall Structure in the Secondary Eyewall Formation of Simulated Tropical Cyclones

Nannan Qin1,2, Liguang Wu1,4, and Qingyuan Liu3 Nannan Qin et al.
  • 1Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200438, China
  • 2State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China
  • 3Nanjing Joint Institute for Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing, China
  • 4Innovation Center of Ocean and Atmosphere System, Zhuhai Fudan Innovation Research Institute,Zhuhai, 518057, China

Abstract. It has been suggested that the inner eyewall structure may play an important role in the secondary eyewall formation (SEF) of tropical cyclones (TCs). This study is to further examine the role of the inner eyewall structure by comparing two numerical experiments, which were conducted with the same large-scale environment and initial and boundary conditions but different grid sizes. The SEF was simulated in the experiment with the finer grid spacing, but not in the other.

Comparing the eyewall structure in the simulated TCs with and without the SEF indicates that the eyewall structure can play an important role in the SEF. For the simulated TC with the SEF, the eyewall is more upright with stronger updrafts, accompanied by a wide eyewall anvil at a higher altitude. Compared to the simulated TC without the SEF, diagnostic analysis reveals that the cooling outside the inner eyewall is induced by the sublimation, melting and evaporation of hydrometeors falling from the eyewall anvil. The cooling also induces upper-level dry, cool inflow below the anvil, prompting the subsidence and moat formation between the inner eyewall and the spiral rainband. In the simulated TC without the SEF, the cooling induced by the falling hydrometeors is significantly reduced and offset by the diabatic warming. There is no upper-level dry inflow below the anvil and no moat formation between the inner eyewall and the spiral rainband. This study suggests that a realistic simulation of the intense eyewall convection is important to the prediction of the SEF in the numerical forecasting model.

Nannan Qin et al.

Status: open (until 20 Jun 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-147', Anonymous Referee #1, 06 May 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-147', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Jun 2021 reply

Nannan Qin et al.

Nannan Qin et al.

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Short summary
Understanding of the secondary eyewall formation is a critical issue to improve the prediction of tropical cyclone intensity. Numerical experiments are conducted to explore the roles of the inner eyewall structure in the secondary eyewall formation. It is found that the inner eyewall structure plays an important role in the secondary eyewall formation of the simulated tropical cyclone.
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