Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-649
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-649
30 Jul 2018
 | 30 Jul 2018
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal ACP but the revision was not accepted.

Global XCO2 anomalies as seen by Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2

Janne Hakkarainen, Iolanda Ialongo, Shamil Maksyutov, and David Crisp

Abstract. NASA's carbon dioxide mission, Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, has been operating for three full years (2015–2017). Here, we provide a global (60° S–60° N) view of the XCO2 anomalies along with their annual variations and seasonal patterns. We show that the XCO2 anomaly patterns are robust and consistent from year-to-year. We compare these anomalies to fluxes from anthropogenic, biospheric and biomass burning and to model-simulated local concentration enhancements. We find that, despite the simplicity of the method, the anomalies describe the spatio-temporal variability of XCO2 (including anthropogenic emissions and seasonal variability related to vegetation and biomass burning) consistently with more complex model-based approaches. We see, for example, that positive anomalies correspond to fossil fuel combustion over the major industrial areas (e.g., China, eastern USA, central Europe, India, and the Highveld region in South Africa), shown as large positive XCO2 enhancements in the model simulations. Also, we find corresponding positive anomalies and fluxes over biomass burning areas during different fire seasons. On the other hand, the largest negative anomalies correspond to the growing season in the northern middle latitudes, characterized by negative XCO2 enhancements from simulations and high SIF values (indicating the occurrence of photosynthesis). Finally, we show how XCO2 anomalies facilitate the detection of anthropogenic signatures for several local scale case studies, both in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. The results demonstrate the potential of satellite-based XCO2 observations for understanding the role of man-made and natural contributions to the atmospheric CO2 levels.

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Janne Hakkarainen, Iolanda Ialongo, Shamil Maksyutov, and David Crisp
 
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Janne Hakkarainen, Iolanda Ialongo, Shamil Maksyutov, and David Crisp
Janne Hakkarainen, Iolanda Ialongo, Shamil Maksyutov, and David Crisp

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Short summary
We provide a global (60° S–60° N) view of the XCO2 anomalies, indicators of CO2 emissions to and removal from the atmosphere, and study their annual variations and seasonal patterns. We see that positive anomalies correspond to the emissions from fossil fuel combustion over the major industrial areas as well as biomass burning during different fire seasons. The largest negative anomalies correspond to the growing seasons in the middle latitudes. The results are achieved using NASA's OCO-2 data.
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