Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1094
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2018-1094

  10 Dec 2018

10 Dec 2018

Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Experimental and model assessment of PM2.5 and BC emissions and concentrations in a Brazilian city – the Curitiba case study

Lars Gidhagen1, Patricia Krecl2, Admir Créso Targino2, Gabriela Polezer3, Ricardo H. M. Godoi3, Francisco Castelhano4, Erika Felix5, Yago Alonso Cipoli2, Francisco Malucelli6, Alyson Wolf7, Marcelo Alonso8, David Segersson1, Jorge Humberto Amorim1, and Francisco Mendonça4 Lars Gidhagen et al.
  • 1Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Norrköping, Sweden
  • 2Federal University of Technology, Graduate Program in Environmental Engineering, Londrina, PR, Brazil
  • 3Federal University of Paraná, Environmental Engineering Department, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
  • 4Federal University of Paraná, Department of Geography, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
  • 5Federal University of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Biology, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
  • 6Institute for Research and Urban Planning of Curitiba (IPPUC), Curitiba Municipality, Brazil
  • 7Curitiba Urbanization (URBS), Curitiba Municipality, Brazil
  • 8Federal University of Pelotas, Faculty of Meteorology, Pelotas, RS, Brazil

Abstract. Data on airborne fine particle emissions and concentrations in cities are valuable to traffic and air quality managers, urban planners and landscape architects, health practitioners, researchers, and ultimately to legislators and decision makers. This study aimed at determining the emissions and ambient concentrations of black carbon (BC) and fine particles (PM2.5) in the city of Curitiba, southern Brazil. The methodology applied combined a month-long monitoring campaign that included both fixed and mobile instruments, the development of emission inventories, and the dispersion simulation from the regional down to the street scale.

The mean urban background PM2.5 concentrations during the campaign were below 10 µg m−3 in Curitiba city center, but two- to three-fold higher in a residential area, indicating the presence of unidentified local sources, possibly linked to wood combustion. Mean BC concentrations seemed to be more uniformly distributed over the city, with urban background levels around 2 µg m−3, which rose to about 5 µg m−3 in heavily trafficked street canyons. The dispersion modeling also showed high PM2.5 and BC concentrations along the heavily transited ring road and over the industrial area southwest of Curitiba. However, the lack of in situ data over this area prevented the corroboration of the model outputs. The integrated approach used in this study can be implemented in other Brazilian cities as long as an open data policy and a close cooperation between municipal authorities and academia can be achieved.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Lars Gidhagen et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Lars Gidhagen et al.

Lars Gidhagen et al.

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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
Exposure to atmospheric fine particles constitutes a threat to health for urban citizens. Data on airborne fine particle emissions and concentrations in cities are valuable to traffic and air quality managers, urban planners, health practitioners, as well as to legislators and decision makers, however this type of data are lacking in most Brazilian cities. The integrated and comparatively rapid methodology described can be applied to other cities requiring a diagnostic air pollution assessment.
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