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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-928
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2017-928
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  27 Oct 2017

27 Oct 2017

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This preprint was under review for the journal ACP but the revision was not accepted.

Global impact of monocyclic aromatics on tropospheric composition

David Cabrera-Perez1, Domenico Taraborrelli2, Jos Lelieveld1, Thorsten Hoffmann3, and Andrea Pozzer1 David Cabrera-Perez et al.
  • 1Atmospheric Chemistry Department, Max-Planck Institute of Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, 55128 Mainz, Germany
  • 2Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich, Germany
  • 3Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Mainz, Duesbergweg 10–14, 55128 Mainz, Germany

Abstract. Aromatic compounds are reactive species influencing ozone formation, OH concentrations and organic aerosol formation. An assessment of their impacts on the gas-phase composition at a global scale has been performed using a general circulation atmospheric-chemistry model.

Globally, we found a small annual average net decrease (less than 3 %) in global OH, ozone, and NOx mixing ratios when aromatic compounds are included in the chemical mechanism. This inclusion of aromatics also results in CO mixing ratio increases, which cause a general decrease in OH concentrations. The largest changes are found in glyoxal and NO3, with increases in the atmospheric burden of 10 % and 6 %, respectively.

Regionally, significant differences were found particularly in high NOx regime areas, with an increase of up to 4 % in O3 mixing ratios and 8 % in OH concentrations. NO3 increased by more than 30 % in several regions of the northern hemisphere, and glyoxal increased up to 40 % in Europe and Asia. Large increases in formaldehyde were found in urban areas.

Although the relative impact of aromatics at the global scale is limited, at a regional level they are important in atmospheric chemistry.

David Cabrera-Perez et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Status: closed
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David Cabrera-Perez et al.

David Cabrera-Perez et al.

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Short summary
Aromatic compounds are present in rural and urban atmospheres. The aim of this work is to disentangle the impacts of these compounds in different important atmospheric chemical species with the help of a numerical model. Aromatics have low impact OH, NOx and Ozone concentrations in the global scale (below 4 %). The impact however is larger in the regional scale (up to 10 %). The largest impact is in glyoxal and NO3 concentrations, with changes up to 10 % globally and 40 % regionally.
Aromatic compounds are present in rural and urban atmospheres. The aim of this work is to...
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