Articles | Volume 23, issue 17
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-9725-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-9725-2023
Research article
 | 
01 Sep 2023
Research article |  | 01 Sep 2023

Stratospheric aerosol size reduction after volcanic eruptions

Felix Wrana, Ulrike Niemeier, Larry W. Thomason, Sandra Wallis, and Christian von Savigny

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Latest update: 27 May 2024
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Short summary
The stratospheric aerosol layer is a naturally occurring and permanent layer of aerosol, in this case very small droplets of mostly sulfuric acid and water, that has a cooling effect on our climate. To quantify this effect and for our general understanding of stratospheric microphysical processes, knowledge of the size of those aerosol particles is needed. Using satellite measurements and atmospheric models we show that some volcanic eruptions can lead to on average smaller aerosol sizes.
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