Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6021–6043, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6021-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6021–6043, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6021-2022
Research article
06 May 2022
Research article | 06 May 2022

Cellulose in atmospheric particulate matter at rural and urban sites across France and Switzerland

Adam Brighty et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-930', Hans Puxbaum, 05 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-930', Anonymous Referee #2, 05 Dec 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-930', Anonymous Referee #3, 10 Dec 2021
  • RC4: 'Comment on acp-2021-930', Hans Puxbaum, 10 Dec 2021
  • AC1: 'Author's comments', Adam Brighty, 24 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Adam Brighty on behalf of the Authors (24 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Mar 2022) by Ivan Kourtchev
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (14 Mar 2022)
RR by Hans Puxbaum (15 Mar 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (15 Mar 2022) by Ivan Kourtchev
AR by Adam Brighty on behalf of the Authors (16 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Mar 2022) by Ivan Kourtchev
Download
Short summary
With an revised analytical method and long-term sampling strategy, we have been able to elucidate much more information about atmospheric plant debris, a poorly understood class of particulate matter. We found weaker seasonal patterns at urban locations compared to rural locations and significant interannual variability in concentrations between previous years and 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. This suggests a possible man-made influence on plant debris concentration and source strength.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint