Articles | Volume 22, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 3507–3524, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3507-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 3507–3524, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-3507-2022

Research article 16 Mar 2022

Research article | 16 Mar 2022

Changes in anthropogenic precursor emissions drive shifts in the ozone seasonal cycle throughout the northern midlatitude troposphere

Henry Bowman et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-786', Anonymous Referee #1, 12 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-786', Anonymous Referee #2, 08 Nov 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-786', David Parrish, 07 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by David Parrish on behalf of the Authors (07 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Jan 2022) by Frank Dentener
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (20 Jan 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (27 Jan 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (28 Jan 2022) by Frank Dentener
AR by David Parrish on behalf of the Authors (07 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Feb 2022) by Frank Dentener
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Short summary
A full understanding of ozone in the troposphere requires investigation of its temporal variability over all timescales. Model simulations show that the northern midlatitude ozone seasonal cycle shifted with industrial development (1850–2014), with an increasing magnitude and a later summer peak. That shift reached a maximum in the mid-1980s, followed by a reversal toward the preindustrial cycle. The few available observations, beginning in the 1970s, are consistent with the model simulations.
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