Articles | Volume 22, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 14133–14146, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-14133-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 14133–14146, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-14133-2022
Research article
04 Nov 2022
Research article | 04 Nov 2022

Different effects of anthropogenic emissions and aging processes on the mixing state of soot particles in the nucleation and accumulation modes

Yuying Wang et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-1065', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Apr 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-1065', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Jul 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2021-1065', Anonymous Referee #3, 11 Jul 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yuying Wang on behalf of the Authors (19 Aug 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Aug 2022) by Barbara Ervens
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (30 Aug 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Sep 2022)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (25 Sep 2022) by Barbara Ervens
AR by Yuying Wang on behalf of the Authors (16 Oct 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Oct 2022) by Barbara Ervens
AR by Yuying Wang on behalf of the Authors (19 Oct 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (20 Oct 2022) by Barbara Ervens
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Short summary
The mixing state of size-resolved soot particles and their influencing factors were investigated. The results suggest anthropogenic emissions and aging processes have diverse impacts on the mixing state of soot particles in different modes. Considering that the mixing state of soot particles is crucial to model aerosol absorption, this finding is important to study particle growth and the warming effect of black carbon aerosols.
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