Articles | Volume 22, issue 19
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-12985-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-12985-2022
Research article
 | 
10 Oct 2022
Research article |  | 10 Oct 2022

Changing ozone sensitivity in the South Coast Air Basin during the COVID-19 period

Jason R. Schroeder, Chenxia Cai, Jin Xu, David Ridley, Jin Lu, Nancy Bui, Fang Yan, and Jeremy Avise

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Short summary
Ozone, a key component of smog, has plagued the Los Angeles (LA) region for decades. Ozone is created by complex chemical reactions that can be greatly impacted by anthropogenic emissions. This study makes use of the COVID-19 period to study the sensitivity of ozone chemistry in LA to certain anthropogenic emissions, notably from vehicles. We find that vehicular emissions of key pollutants dropped by up to 25 % during COVID-19, which caused a fundamental shift in ozone chemistry in the region.
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