Articles | Volume 21, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 8933–8959, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-8933-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 8933–8959, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-8933-2021

Research article 14 Jun 2021

Research article | 14 Jun 2021

A long-term study of cloud residuals from low-level Arctic clouds

Linn Karlsson et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Paul Zieger on behalf of the Authors (08 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Dec 2020) by Yafang Cheng
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (17 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Feb 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Feb 2021) by Yafang Cheng
AR by Paul Zieger on behalf of the Authors (22 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Mar 2021) by Yafang Cheng
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (15 Apr 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (20 Apr 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Apr 2021) by Yafang Cheng
AR by Paul Zieger on behalf of the Authors (29 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Aerosol–cloud interactions in the Arctic are poorly understood largely due to a lack of observational data. We present the first direct, long-term measurements of cloud residuals, i.e. the particles that remain when cloud droplets and ice crystals are dried. These detailed observations of cloud residuals cover more than 2 years, which is unique for the Arctic and globally. This work studies the size distributions of cloud residuals, their seasonality, and dependence on meteorology.
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