Articles | Volume 21, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2363–2381, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2363-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 2363–2381, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2363-2021

Research article 18 Feb 2021

Research article | 18 Feb 2021

Impacts of cloud microphysics parameterizations on simulated aerosol–cloud interactions for deep convective clouds over Houston

Yuwei Zhang et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yuwei Zhang on behalf of the Authors (03 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Sep 2020) by Fangqun Yu
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (16 Sep 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (22 Sep 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Sep 2020) by Fangqun Yu
AR by Yuwei Zhang on behalf of the Authors (03 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Nov 2020) by Fangqun Yu
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (01 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Dec 2020) by Fangqun Yu
AR by Yuwei Zhang on behalf of the Authors (11 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Dec 2020) by Fangqun Yu
Download
Short summary
Impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds (DCCs) and precipitation are examined using both the Morrison bulk and spectral bin microphysics (SBM) schemes. With the SBM scheme, anthropogenic aerosols notably invigorate convective intensity and precipitation, causing better agreement between the simulated DCCs and observations; this effect is absent with the Morrison scheme, mainly due to limitations of the saturation adjustment approach for droplet condensation and evaporation.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint