Articles | Volume 21, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 18101–18121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18101-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 18101–18121, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18101-2021
Research article
13 Dec 2021
Research article | 13 Dec 2021

Estimating 2010–2015 anthropogenic and natural methane emissions in Canada using ECCC surface and GOSAT satellite observations

Sabour Baray et al.

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Short summary
We use 2010–2015 surface and satellite observations to disentangle methane from anthropogenic and natural sources in Canada. Using a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), the mismatch between modelled and observed methane concentrations can be used to infer emissions according to Bayesian statistics. Compared to prior knowledge, we show higher anthropogenic emissions attributed to energy and/or agriculture in Western Canada and lower natural emissions from Boreal wetlands.
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