Articles | Volume 21, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13131–13147, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13131-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 13131–13147, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-13131-2021

Research article 06 Sep 2021

Research article | 06 Sep 2021

Assessing urban methane emissions using column-observing portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers and a novel Bayesian inversion framework

Taylor S. Jones et al.

Data sets

Indianapolis EM27/SUN Observations and Footprints for May 2016 T. Jones, J. Franklin, J. Chen, F. Dietrich, K. Hajny, J. Paetzold, A. Wenzel, C. Gately, E. Gottlieb, H. Parker, M. Dubey, F. Hase, P. Shepson, L. Mielke, S. Wofsy https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/JWL4PK

Model code and software

Indianapolis EM27/SUN Observations and Footprints for May 2016 T. Jones, J. Franklin, J. Chen, F. Dietrich, K. Hajny, J. Paetzold, A. Wenzel, C. Gately, E. Gottlieb, H. Parker, M. Dubey, F. Hase, P. Shepson, L. Mielke, S. Wofsy https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/JWL4PK

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Short summary
Methane emissions from leaks in natural gas pipes are often a large source in urban areas, but they are difficult to measure on a city-wide scale. Here we use an array of innovative methane sensors distributed around the city of Indianapolis and a new method of combining their data with an atmospheric model to accurately determine the magnitude of these emissions, which are about 70 % larger than predicted. This method can serve as a framework for cities trying to account for their emissions.
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