Articles | Volume 21, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 10557–10587, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10557-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 10557–10587, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10557-2021
Research article
14 Jul 2021
Research article | 14 Jul 2021

Forest-fire aerosol–weather feedbacks over western North America using a high-resolution, online coupled air-quality model

Paul A. Makar et al.

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Latest update: 06 Dec 2022
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Short summary
We have examined the effects of airborne particles on absorption and scattering of incoming sunlight by the particles themselves via cloud formation. We used an advanced, combined high-resolution weather forecast and chemical transport computer model, for western North America, and simulations with and without the connections between particles and weather enabled. Feedbacks improved weather and air pollution forecasts and changed cloud behaviour and forest-fire pollutant amount and height.
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