Articles | Volume 20, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9771–9782, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9771-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9771–9782, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9771-2020
Research article
20 Aug 2020
Research article | 20 Aug 2020

Investigating stratospheric changes between 2009 and 2018 with halogenated trace gas data from aircraft, AirCores, and a global model focusing on CFC-11

Johannes C. Laube et al.

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Latest update: 08 Aug 2022
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Short summary
We demonstrate that AirCore technology, which is based on small low-cost balloons, can provide access to trace gas measurements such as CFCs at ultra-low abundances. This is a new way to quantify ozone-depleting, and related, substances in the stratosphere, which is largely inaccessible to aircraft. We show two potential uses: (a) tracking the stratospheric circulation, which is predicted to change, and (b) assessing three common meteorological reanalyses driving a global stratospheric model.
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